PRIDE PRIDE PRIDE PRIDE Pisces Monkey Atheist Coexist No Hate Otherkin
infiniteragequit:

upgraders:

pussy-pat:

christel-thoughts:

this is what i just picked up from the grocery store. it cost $32. Thirty. two. dollars. for 1 pineapple, 2 bags of grapes, a small container of raspberries, 1 soft drink and 2/$1 nuts…. 
do you know how much junk food i could have for $32? do you have any clue how much McDonald’s you can get for $32?
stop shaming fat people poorer than you or people poorer than you in general for not eating healthier. stop lying about how cheap it is or how it’s comparable to fast food. just stop.

!!!!!!!



Fresh fruits fucking expensive

infiniteragequit:

upgraders:

pussy-pat:

christel-thoughts:

this is what i just picked up from the grocery store. it cost $32. Thirty. two. dollars. for 1 pineapple, 2 bags of grapes, a small container of raspberries, 1 soft drink and 2/$1 nuts…. 

do you know how much junk food i could have for $32? do you have any clue how much McDonald’s you can get for $32?

stop shaming fat people poorer than you or people poorer than you in general for not eating healthier. stop lying about how cheap it is or how it’s comparable to fast food. just stop.

!!!!!!!

Fresh fruits fucking expensive

(via i-am-wolfechilde)

i-am-wolfechilde:

starpulses:

Nintendo confirmed today that if you pre-order Super Smash Bros for the 3DS at any Target store, it’ll come with an exclusive Zero Suit DLC alt costume for Wario!

Wh-wha?

i-am-wolfechilde:

starpulses:

Nintendo confirmed today that if you pre-order Super Smash Bros for the 3DS at any Target store, it’ll come with an exclusive Zero Suit DLC alt costume for Wario!

Wh-wha?

What

What

inertialicious:

lissymac37:

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

This is so important. Girls pay attention. Boys, if you are a brother, father, cousin of a girl, pay attention.

This is CRITICAL

(via i-am-wolfechilde)

So anyway, I was having this argument with my father about Martin Luther King and how his message was too conservative compared to Malcolm X’s message. My father got really angry at me. It wasn’t that he disliked Malcolm X, but his point was that Malcolm X hadn’t accomplished anything as Dr. King had.

I was kind of sarcastic and asked something like, so what did Martin Luther King accomplish other than giving his “I have a dream speech.”

Before I tell you what my father told me, I want to digress. Because at this point in our amnesiac national existence, my question pretty much reflects the national civic religion view of what Dr. King accomplished. He gave this great speech. Or some people say, “he marched.” I was so angry at Mrs. Clinton during the primaries when she said that Dr. King marched, but it was LBJ who delivered the Civil Rights Act.

At this point, I would like to remind everyone exactly what Martin Luther King did, and it wasn’t that he “marched” or gave a great speech.

My father told me with a sort of cold fury, “Dr. King ended the terror of living in the south.”

Please let this sink in and and take my word and the word of my late father on this. If you are a white person who has always lived in the U.S. and never under a brutal dictatorship, you probably don’t know what my father was talking about.

But this is what the great Dr. Martin Luther King accomplished. Not that he marched, nor that he gave speeches.

He ended the terror of living as a black person, especially in the south.

I’m guessing that most of you, especially those having come fresh from seeing The Help, may not understand what this was all about. But living in the south (and in parts of the midwest and in many ghettos of the north) was living under terrorism.

It wasn’t that black people had to use a separate drinking fountain or couldn’t sit at lunch counters, or had to sit in the back of the bus.

You really must disabuse yourself of this idea. Lunch counters and buses were crucial symbolic planes of struggle that the civil rights movement used to dramatize the issue, but the main suffering in the south did not come from our inability to drink from the same fountain, ride in the front of the bus or eat lunch at Woolworth’s.

It was that white people, mostly white men, occasionally went berserk, and grabbed random black people, usually men, and lynched them. You all know about lynching. But you may forget or not know that white people also randomly beat black people, and the black people could not fight back, for fear of even worse punishment.

This constant low level dread of atavistic violence is what kept the system running. It made life miserable, stressful and terrifying for black people.

White people also occasionally tried black people, especially black men, for crimes for which they could not conceivably be guilty. With the willing participation of white women, they often accused black men of “assault,” which could be anything from rape to not taking off one’s hat, to “reckless eyeballing.”

This is going to sound awful and perhaps a stain on my late father’s memory, but when I was little, before the civil rights movement, my father taught me many, many humiliating practices in order to prevent the random, terroristic, berserk behavior of white people. The one I remember most is that when walking down the street in New York City side by side, hand in hand with my hero-father, if a white woman approached on the same sidewalk, I was to take off my hat and walk behind my father, because he had been taught in the south that black males for some reason were supposed to walk single file in the presence of any white lady.

This was just one of many humiliating practices we were taught to prevent white people from going berserk.

I remember a huge family reunion one August with my aunts and uncles and cousins gathered around my grandparents’ vast breakfast table laden with food from the farm, and the state troopers drove up to the house with a car full of rifles and shotguns, and everyone went kind of weirdly blank. They put on the masks that black people used back then to not provoke white berserkness. My strong, valiant, self-educated, articulate uncles, whom I adored, became shuffling, Step-N-Fetchits to avoid provoking the white men. Fortunately the troopers were only looking for an escaped convict. Afterward, the women, my aunts, were furious at the humiliating performance of the men, and said so, something that even a child could understand.

This is the climate of fear that Dr. King ended.

If you didn’t get taught such things, let alone experience them, I caution you against invoking the memory of Dr. King as though he belongs exclusively to you and not primarily to African Americans.

The question is, how did Dr. King do this—and of course, he didn’t do it alone.

(Of all the other civil rights leaders who helped Dr. King end this reign of terror, I think the most under appreciated is James Farmer, who founded the Congress of Racial Equality and was a leader of nonviolent resistance, and taught the practices of nonviolent resistance.)

So what did they do?

They told us: Whatever you are most afraid of doing vis-a-vis white people, go do it. Go ahead down to city hall and try to register to vote, even if they say no, even if they take your name down.

Go ahead sit at that lunch counter. Sue the local school board. All things that most black people would have said back then, without exaggeration, were stark raving insane and would get you killed.

If we do it all together, we’ll be okay.

They made black people experience the worst of the worst, collectively, that white people could dish out, and discover that it wasn’t that bad. They taught black people how to take a beating—from the southern cops, from police dogs, from fire department hoses. They actually coached young people how to crouch, cover their heads with their arms and take the beating. They taught people how to go to jail, which terrified most decent people.

And you know what? The worst of the worst, wasn’t that bad.

Once people had been beaten, had dogs sicced on them, had fire hoses sprayed on them, and been thrown in jail, you know what happened?

These magnificent young black people began singing freedom songs in jail.

That, my friends, is what ended the terrorism of the south. Confronting your worst fears, living through it, and breaking out in a deep throated freedom song. The jailers knew they had lost when they beat the crap out of these young Negroes and the jailed, beaten young people began to sing joyously, first in one town then in another. This is what the writer, James Baldwin, captured like no other writer of the era.

Please let this sink in. It wasn’t marches or speeches. It was taking a severe beating, surviving and realizing that our fears were mostly illusory and that we were free.

Daily Kos :: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did 

Reblogging this so I can come back to it in the spring when I teach the Civil Rights Movement to my 5th graders. 

(via copperoranges)

(via princessmelina)

Oh, apologies in advance (or perhaps belated apologies?) to anyone who tries to get in contact with me this weekend. Today was mentally and physically exhausting and my mind and body have gone on ahead without me and decided that they’re done today.

Today wasn’t particularly bad or anything, just exhausting and tedious - I was helping my mom organize her office (she’s not only the office manager, but hr and finance so she has soooo many documents and just random junk). It probably doesn’t help that I didn’t get to sleep last night haha. I got distracted by a drawing I’ve been working on, whoops.

Tomorrow I’ll be visiting with my grandparents so I wont have internet access for most of the day. So yeah - I’ll be available again Monday, but for now I’m not really going to be online, sorry :0

scatteredgathered:

We’re fine. We’re fine!! Everyone stay calm.

scatteredgathered:

We’re fine. We’re fine!! Everyone stay calm.

(via rusticshadows)

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.
It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.
Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.
A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.
Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:
Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+
Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 
If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 
BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

mikikoponczeck:

pancakesprince:

naiadestricolor:

coelasquid:

leighanief:

luvlysmilk:

delano-laramie:

Stay away from Fiverr. Promoting this sort of thing is NOT okay.

It’s ruining an industry.

Wtf wow

What bullshit. Yeah, don’t worry people, you’re getting so ripped off, paying an already moderate amount for something your company is young to use and advertise either every minute of everyday for the rest of it’s existence.

Jog like artists need to eat, or pay bills, or have a roof over their heads or anything. Not like they’re PEOPLE trying to make an honest living or anything.

Every time I see that picture on my dash I expect it to be a prank and that I’m going to scroll down and see a bunch of examples of their $5 logos that amount to crudely drawn dicks.

Oh boy, logo mills.  I just want to pull up something from The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing and Ethical Guidelines about these kinds of companies.  It’s long but I think it’s worth reading the full thing:

Graphic designers are facing similar assaults on their profession by companies that devalue professional design services by competing unfairly on price with shoddy design, sub-standard services, unfair labor practices, and with no regard to copyright.  So-called “logo mills” are online operations that hire “designers” at ridiculously low rates to pump out off-the-shelf logos that are marketed to consumers at cut-rate prices.  Most of these pre-made logos are simply pieced together clip art with mundane type treatment.  The same logos are sold over and over again.  Buyers can pay higher prices to get a “unique” logo, which means the company promises not to resell the design and the buyer simply owns the copyright as part of the package.  “Customization” may consist of little more than providing the same logo in a different color scheme or with adjustments to the font.

A second type of logo mill offers “original” logos.  The price of their services is based on the number of concepts, rounds of revisions, and designers working on the project (the greater the number, the higher the price), yet their prices are still below the prevailing market rates for professional design services.  Their success, despite such low prices, is due to their abusive labor practices, which treat designers as just another expendable commodity instead of highly-trained professionals.  Logo mills are the digital sweatshops of the design world.  In one such company, designers work on per project basis (earning $25-40 per project) in extremely competitive conditions with no assurance of continued work and no copyright fees.  Designers sign up for a project on a first-come, first-served basis.  Since multiple designers work on a project, they “compete” to have their design accepted by the client.  Successful designers are awarded points as well as a monetary bonus.  Designers are required to critique each other’s work with points being deducted from those whose work is panned.  A loss of points mean that the designer’s fee will be lowered on future projects.

Logo mills have an insidious impact on the perception among business owners regarding copyrights.  By simply ignoring the existence of copyrights in the pricing structure, logo mills are completely devaluing copyrights.  The result is a business community that increasingly is unaware of the existence or value of copyright and unwilling to pay what to them seems to be an unfair or unnecessary fee tacked on a job.

Also, even $100 for a logo (does that even include copyrights or…?) is incredible low.  If you’re curious how much a logo should go for:

  • Very small businesses (ie law firms, retail, etc.): $1,200-3,000 for a simple logo with all rights included
  • Minor corporation: $1,200-12,000
  • Major corporation: $4,000-25,000+

Obviously the price will also depend on the designer’s experience, copyright transfer, how fast the client needs the logo, revisions, tech specs for the logo, etc etc but you get the idea. 

If you’re an artist or designer, don’t go anywhere near companies that will treat you as a commodity.  And if you’re a client, do some research on how much these types of things actually cost and what is involved in the cost.  If you go to one of these companies for design services, you helping perpetuate these gross practices and further undervaluing art/design and copyright.  It’s why the Graphic Artists Guild and their handbook exists, as a resource for both artists and clients.

I would like to input that big big big companies are even willing to spend millions on a logo. 

BECAUSE LOGOS ARE YOUR CORPORATE IDENTITY. YOUR COMPANY’S IDENTITY. it’s like giving a face to your baby.

I usually don’t reblog, but this is important. You thought Deviantart point commissions were a bad joke, this is a whole new level of wtf. 
The reason people say ‘You can’t live off art’ is because of people who think this is okay.

Bones is moving out, meaning one of the two perfect spots for Whitney is open, which means I cannot go visit other towns or Streetpass anyone at all lol

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